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for debilitating diseases. that's not a recipe for growth and we can reduce our deficit, including making some smart decisions on medicare in particular, where we're focused on lowering health care costs by reforming how health care is delivered but we don't need to be voucherizing the system to dump those costs on to seniors because, frankly, they can't afford it right now. >> pelley: there is a lot of rhetoric about medicare. what do you intend to do? >> well, i don't want any change to medicare for current seniors or for those that are nearing retirement. so the plan stays exactly same. >> pelley: make sure i understand. the idea under your plan for future seniors would be that the federal government would write that senior a check, essentially and say "now, you can go buy a private insurance plan or you can buy medicare from the federal government"? >> is that essentially it? >> that's essentially it. people would have a choice of either traditional government- run fee-for-service medicare or a private plan which has to offer the same benefits. it can't be skinnyed down. >> pelley: will th
would end deductions and loopholes and that he would still be able to balance the deficit by doing that. of course, as you pointed out, he will not say which deductions. why do you say that raises a red flag? >> under governor romney's plan, i pay well over 20% now. so if you eliminate the mortgage tax deduction and the charitable tax deduction, i'll still be ahead. so to do it, you have to go down and raise -- and cut the deductions enough that you wind up raising taxes on people in the middle income group. that's the problem. >> do you think this election -- the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it not only as a possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win. but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the huse and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. if president
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